Guitar building update (June 2017)

As I have been neglecting this blog over the last month, I have been at a loss of where to start back with posts. I don’t have any exciting discoveries to share in my building process at the moment, and I have already written about all of the mundane processes of side bending, fretboard slotting, and endless sanding, so I thought that I would just get back into it with an update style post. The other reason for this is that I have not been keeping up with my camera, so I really don’t have any process pictures to show! I think that I need to start keeping the camera in the shop!

I have decided to focus on three of the guitars that I am working on. I ordered a soundboard for the 4th guitar, and I am not entirely happy with the wood grade, plus the humidity has sky-rocketed, so I will not be doing much brace gluing for the next little while.

The three guitars that I am focusing on are the steel-string and the two Torres copies, and they are all nearing completion! I just have a lot of sanding to do, finishing, bridge building, and set up left. I am pretty happy with how everything has turned out so far.

The steel-string guitar is still in two pieces, but it will be like this until the guitar is finished. This guitar has a bolt-on neck, so I will wait to attach the two pieces together until after the varnish is dry. This will make my life much easier when it comes to applying the finish – fewer nooks and crannies means less trouble while polishing and fewer weird brush marks.

I am particularly happy with how the binding on this guitar is turning out. I just used cutoffs from the guitar sides and added white purfling lines to separate the bindings from the sides and top/back. A little more clean up left, but overall, it is looking pretty sharp (if I do say so myself).

I am also quite happy with how the butt-joint inlay worked out:

The commissioned Torres guitar is looking quite well also. This guitar just needs a bit of sanding and clean up, and then I will be ready to apply some varnish later this week.

With the back and sides being of maple, the finishing process should be fairly easy as I will only have to pore-fill the headstock and neck.

The third guitar is the almost identical twin of the guitar above, just with quilted maple back and sides, and with walnut headstock and bindings. This guitar will be for sale at some point, depending how attached I become.

I will be sanding all of these guitars this week and then moving them up to my spare bedroom to be finished. I am trying a new varnish this time, so I will definitely be reporting on how that goes! Lots of good reviews from friends, so I think it should be a positive experience!

If all goes well, I’ll be delivering these guitars at the beginning of July, and I will be showing the second Torres guitar at the Hamilton festival on Saturday, July 8th. Come out to the festival if you would like to try it out!

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Emily

I play guitar. I build guitars when I can. I enjoy all sorts of music, but Baroque, 'classical' guitar music of the 19th and 20th centuries, and jazz music hold special places in my heart. I am using this blog to document some of my adventures in guitar building, performing, and teaching, and hope to give my readers a bit of a look at the world inside a guitar.

One thought on “Guitar building update (June 2017)”

  1. Emily, the guitars are looking great! Especially liking the colors of the Torres guitar and the other one, the Spruce tops and maple back and sides, very classy elegant looking. Nicely done.

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